A Relaxing Day on the Net

Ever wondered what the view is like from the bow net? Check out this video we came across.



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Nighttime Photos from a Royal Clipper Cruise

Here are some nighttime photos from our wonderful cruise on the Royal Clipper. It was an amazing experience.



My best,

Nina Long





















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Sailing Lingo Answer: Ditty Bag

We asked, what does “ditty bag” mean and where did the term originate?



The ditty bag is a small bag in which a sailor keeps small tools and equipment, also personal articles according to John Rogers in Origins of Sea Terms.



The ditty bag and the sea bag were the first projects for an apprentice either in the sail-maker's trade or as a working seaman. The reason for this is that these items incorporated primary skills in making and repairing sails. Besides learning the techniques of seaming, making twine grommets and sewing eyelets, the bags were an essential part of the sailor's sea-going wardrobe.



There are innumerable variations of the ditty bag; some are very intricate but most are simple and functional. Loui Bartos’ article, The Sailor’s Tradition Ditty Bag and Ditty Box, goes into much detail of the history and origins of the bag and even features a diagram for those that would like to try their hand at making their own ditty bag for their next sailing!
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Sailing Lingo: Ditty Bag

Today’s challenge is: Ditty Bag. Do you know what this phrase means and how it originated?


Sailing Lingo aims to test your knowledge of the peculiar and sometimes indecipherable language of sailing. We pose a question and see who can answer it most accurately in the comments on the post. The following day we’ll post the answer to the question and save you some Googling

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Postcards At the Helm

Guest Katy Hope shared this great  photo and note  from a recent cruise of her husband at the help
"I personally felt more confident with a real crew member in charge...no offence to my darling husband!"

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Port of the Week: Amorgos, Greece







Amorgos, Greece, is one of the popular Greek Islands of the Cyclades. Located near Naxos and Ios, a few hours from Piraeus, Athens, its the island chosen by filmmaker Luc Besson for the scene of “The Big Blue.”



This Greek island has a lot to offer: beautiful beaches in crystal waters, whitewashed houses and windmills. The island’s trademark is the beautiful monastery of Hozoviotissa which is wedged into a huge precipice at 300m from the sea.



While at Amorgos cruisers may want to rent a bike and explore many of the small villages making up the island. At Chora, the capital, guests will find Greece's smallest church large enough to accomodate three! This is truly a place where the time has stopped, and thanks to local regulations, the architecture is kept in the traditional style.



In Potamos you can stroll around in the little winding streets that were built that way to confuse the pirates. Katapola, another village next to the sea, features the monastery Chozoviotissa which according to tradition was built in the 9th century after a ship had sunk just outside Amorgos carrying an icon of the Virgin Mary. With a little luck the monks will offer you some local liqueur.



Another option while at Amorgos is snorkelting, especially at Mourou but also at Agia Anna. You can also enjoy long walks through the harsh but impressive nature. A lot of people enjoy fishing here, and there are various donkey rides offered.



Before leaving guest may want to visit the local bar in Katapola that every night shows "The Big Blue", fitting while at this Greek paradise.
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Postcards from Royal Clipper's Bow Net

Mike & Laura Rech sent us these great photos and note.
Photos of us taken during our Royal Clipper Windward Island cruise January 2009. Looking forward to taking others when we join you for two weeks this year!



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Sailing Lingo Answer: Fathom

Yesterday we asked, what does “fathom” mean and where did the term originate?



Today a fathom is now a nautical unit of length equal to six feet. Fathom was originally a land measuring term derived from the Anglo-Saxon word "faethm" meaning to embrace. In those days, most measurements were based on average size of parts of the body, such as the hand (horses are still measured this way) or the foot (that's why 12 inches are so named). A fathom is the average distance from fingertip to fingertip of the outstretched arms of a man — about six feet. Since a man stretches out his arms to embrace his sweetheart, Britain's Parliament declared that distance be called a fathom and it became a unit of measure.



The word was also used to describe taking the measure or "to fathom" something. Today, of course, when one is trying to figure something out, they are trying to "fathom" it.



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Sailing Lingo: Fathom

Today’s challenge is: Fathom. Do you know what this phrase means and how it originated?



Sailing Lingo aims to test your knowledge of the peculiar and sometimes indecipherable language of sailing. We pose a question and see who can answer it most accurately in the comments on the post. The following day we’ll post the answer to the question and save you some Googling!
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A Bowsprit Sunset

Guest Harriet Hall sent in this beautiful sunset photo of the bowsprit net taken on the Royal Clipper crossing from Lisbon to Barbados.



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Postcards from the Bow Net

Guest Amanda Behrmann shared these great bow net photos.


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Sunset Margaritas on Star Clipper

Guests Ian and Katy Hope shared this note and beautiful sunsets photos from their Star Clipper cruise.


As the new brochure dropped into the letterbox today, we could think of no better reason to review our photographic memories of a truly marvellous voyage. We have recently met up with some great people we got to know on our trip and I am sure there are many more of the 143 guests who may like to keep in touch. So...class of July 2009... I know there's, many more wonderful photographs out there that will inspire us all....let's share.

A beautiful ship, inspiring guests, gorgeous locations, superb weather almost equal paradise, to complete the equation we needed the people who really made the difference. So thank you to our courageous Captain and his extremely competent crew, the chief engineer and his boys and our creative sail master plus the beautiful and entertaining cruise director and her sports and entertainment team along with our welcoming hotel manager and devoted staff. Now then back to that brochure... - Ian and Katy





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How to Get a Bird's Eye View from Royal Clipper

Guest Claudia Brooks shared this great video she shot of fellow guests climbing to the crow's nest on Royal Clipper.


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Sailing Lingo: Jury

Yesterday we asked, what does "jury” mean and where did the term originate?



A jury is a temporary or makeshift arrangement of any of a vessel's gear due to damage, such as a jury rudder. There are a few possibilities to its origins; one an old French word, jornal, or jurnal, for the day, implyng temporary; another also old French, ajuirer, to help and this one goes back to Latin, adiutare, aid.



The phrase "jury rigged" has been in use since at least 1788. However, the adjectival use of "jury" in the sense of makeshift or temporary dates from at least 1616, when it appeared in A Description of New England. It appeared again, in a similar passage, in Smith's more extensive The General History of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles published in 1624.
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Sailing Lingo: Jury

Today’s challenge is: Jury. Do you know what this phrase means and how it originated?



Sailing Lingo aims to test your knowledge of the peculiar and sometimes indecipherable language of sailing. We pose a question and see who can answer it most accurately in the comments on the post. The following day we’ll post the answer to the question and save you some Googling!
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Postcards from the Bow Net

Guest, John Mallinckrodt, sent in a couple of his favorite bow net photos while in on board Royal Clipper in the Caribbean.



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Postcards from Tahiti

John Mallinckrodt sent in a couple of his favorite bow net photos while in on board Star Flyer in Tahiti.





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Postcard from Royal Clipper's Bow Net

Sheri sent this great bow net photo from her December 2009 cruise on Royal Clipper.



"Tough morning on the Royal Clipper."

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Sailing Lingo: Whiskers

Yesterday we asked, what does "whiskers" mean and where did the term originat?



According to John G. Rogers' "Origins of Sea Terms" (also known as Whisker Booms and Shrouds) Lateral bracing to the bowsprit and jibboom of a sailing craft. One guess is that it was a nickname, from the similarity to dogs' and cats' whiskers.
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Sailing Lingo: Whiskers

Today’s challenge is: Whiskers. Do you know what this phrase means and how it originated?



Sailing Lingo aims to test your knowledge of the peculiar and sometimes indecipherable language of sailing. We pose a question and see who can answer it most accurately in the comments on the post. The following day we’ll post the answer to the question and save you some Googling!
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